Climate Change and the Migration of Trees

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“About three-quarters of tree species common to eastern American forests—including white oaks, sugar maples, and American hollies—have shifted their population center west since 1980. More than half of the species studied also moved northward during the same period.
 
These results, among the first to use empirical data to look at how climate change is shaping eastern forests, were published in Science Advances on Wednesday…The results are fascinating in part because they don’t immediately make sense. But the team has a hypothesis: While climate change has elevated temperatures across the eastern United States, it has significantly altered rainfall totals. The northeast has gotten a little more rain since 1980 than it did during the proceeding century, while the southeast has gotten much less rain. The Great Plains, especially in Oklahoma and Kansas, get much more than historically normal.
 
‘Different species are responding to climate change differently. Most of the broad-leaf species—deciduous trees—are following moisture moving westward. The evergreen trees—the needle species—are primarily moving northward,’ said Songlin Fei, a professor of forestry at Purdue University and one of the authors of the study.
 
There are a patchwork of other forces which could cause tree populations to shift west, though. Changes in land use, wildfire frequency, and the arrival of pests and blights could be shifting the population. So might the success of conservation efforts. But Fei and his colleagues argue that at least 20 percent of the change in population area is driven by changes in precipitation, which are heavily influenced by human-caused climate change.
 
What concerns the team is that—if deciduous trees are moving westward while conifers move northward—important ecological communities of forests could start to break up in the east. Forests are defined as much by the mix of species, and the interaction between them, as by the simple presence of a lot of trees. If different species migrate in different directions, then communities could start to collapse.”

“Mapping the History of Racial Terror” Map of Over a Century of White Supremacy Mob Violence/ Documented Lynchings

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The Civil War may have freed an estimated 4 million slaves, but that wasn’t nearly the end of acts of racial violence committed against African Americans. Acts of domestic terrorism against black people include the thousands murdered in public lynchings. Now, an interactive map provides a detailed look at almost every documented lynching between the 1830s and 1960s.

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Hand-Drawn Infographics of African-American Life (1900)

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“Created by Du Bois and his students at Atlanta, the charts, many of which focus on economic life in Georgia, managed to condense an enormous amount of data into a set of aesthetically daring and easily digestible visualisations. As Alison Meier notes in Hyperallergic, ‘they’re strikingly vibrant and modern, almost anticipating the crossing lines of Piet Mondrian or the intersecting shapes of Wassily Kandinsky.'”

National Parks Against Trump

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“‘AltUSNatParkService’ is billing itself as ‘The Unofficial ‘Resistance’ team of U.S. National Park Service. Not taxpayer subsidised! Come for rugged scenery, fossil beds, 89 million acres of landscape.’ A pinned tweet on its page notes, ‘Can’t wait for President Trump to call us FAKE NEWS. You can take our official twitter, but you’ll never take our free time!’

David Harvey and Robert Brenner discuss Trump, finance and the end of capitalism

Originally posted by multipliciudades – Video of David Harvey and Robert Brenner at the CUNY Graduate Center debating “What now? The Roots of the Economic Crisis and the Way Forward.”

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Here is the video of the debate between David Harvey and Robert Brenner last week at the CUNY Graduate Center, with the title ‘What now? The roots of the economic crisis and the way forward’. Don’t miss the discussion about Trump, especially in the last third of the footage.

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How the Federal Government Made the Maps That Crippled Black Neighborhoods

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“Building off several previous projects, Mapping Inequality is a database of more than 150 federal ‘risk maps,’ the New Deal DNA that would dictate decades of disinvestment in cities. These maps, as Oscar Perry Abello writes for Next City, illustrate ‘how the great government-backed wealth-creation machine of the 1930s only worked for white people.’
 

U.S. “Megaregions”

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“Using a combination of math and maps, Garrett Dash Nelson, a postdoctoral student in geography at Dartmouth College, and Alasdair Rae, an urban data analyst at the University of Sheffield, solidify the concept of the ‘megaregion’ as an interlocking, yet self-contained, economic zone. They use millions of point-to-point daily commutes—perhaps the best proxy for economic geography there is—to outline at least 35 urban cluster-oids around the U.S. What gets revealed, according to the paper, are a ‘set of overlapping, interconnected cogs which, working together, constitute the functional economy of the nation.'”